The Search for Edward II’s Descendants 6) – Lady Elizabeth Plantagenet

With this post I’m going right back up the tree to Elizabeth Plantagenet (7 August 1282 – 5 May 1316). She was the youngest daughter of Edward I and Eleanor of Castile, and two years older than her brother, Edward II. For a short careful and detailed biography by Kathryn Warner, click here. For the Auramala project, what we want to know is not the details of Elizabeth’s day to day life, but simply who her daughters were, and dates of when she lived. However, even that creates a story! Firstly, thanks to her royal status, we actually can date both her birth and death, unlike most women of her age. We have that rare gift to medieval historians, a source! A fragment of the roll of daily expenses in Queen Eleanor’s household shows that she was churched on Sunday, 6 September 1282 (P.R.O. E 101/684/62 m.1). Since we know queens were usually confined for thirty days following the birth of a daughter, Elizabeth’s birth may be dated c. 7 August 1282. 1 We also know the location of her birth, Rhuddlan Castle, in Wales, as the Chronicle of Bury St. Edmunds states: “1282. Alienora regina Anglie apud Rothelan filiam peperit quam uocauit Elizabeth.”2 (Eleanor, queen of England, gave birth to a daughter at Rhuddlan, whom she named Elizabeth.) Moving on to her children. Elizabeth first married in 1297 (aged fourteen) the twelve year old Jan I, Count of Holland. It was a short lived marriage, and they did not spend much time together, Elizabeth choosing (of her own will, yes, that’s right, important medieval women could make some decisions!) to remain in England rather than go to Holland with her husband. She did go there for a few months in 1299, but Jan, now fifteen years old, died there on 10th November 1299. No children were born of the marriage, and a combination of distance, youth, and Jan’s ill health make it unlikely that it was ever consummated. No Dutch relations of Edward II to be traced from this line then, but fortunately, Elizabeth’s story doesn’t end here. Our seventeen year old widowed princess returned to England, and she would have known that she would be marrying again, probably fairly soon. Women of high status families, particularly when at a fertile age, were incredibly useful and powerful in politics, cementing alliances. This time she married an Englishman, Humphry de Bohun, 4th Earl of Hereford, 3rd of Essex, and Constable of England, at Westminister Abbey on 14 November 1302. The fruits of this marriage are a goldmine for us. Eleven children in thirteen years! Including four daughters, who we will be looking into in future posts. Sadly, this state of almost constant pregnancy and childbirth must have taken its toll on Elizabeth’s health. On 5 May 1316 she went into labour, giving birth to another daughter, Isabella. Both Elizabeth and her daughter Isabella died shortly after the birth, and were buried together in Waltham Abbey. A sad end to the story, but don’t worry, there’ll be another one. Enrica Biasi (The following information is courtesy of Craig L. Foster. Mr Foster is a research consultant at FamilySearch’s Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah (www.familysearch.org). FamilySearch collects digitized records and other information to assist people around the world searching after their ancestors. FamilySearch does not normally perform research on DNA and to search for living descendants.) Generation 2

  1. Elizabeth Plantagenet

Lady Elizabeth Plantagenet was born in August 1282 at Rhuddlan Castle, Rhuddlan, Denbighshire, Wales.2 She was the daughter of Edward I ‘Longshanks’, King of England and Eleanor de Castilla, Comtesse de Ponthieu. She married, firstly, Jean I Graaf van Hollant en Zeeland, son of Florent V Graaf van Hollant and Beatrix de Flandre, on 18 January 1297 at Ipswich Priory Church, Ipswich, Suffolk, England.2 She married, secondly, Humphrey de Bohun, 4th Earl of Hereford, son of Humphrey de Bohun, 3rd Earl of Hereford and Maud de Fiennes, on 14 November 1302 at Westminster Abbey, Westminster, London, England.1 She died on 5 May 1316 at age 33 at Quendon, Essex, England, childbirth.3 She was buried at Walden Abbey, Essex, England.3 From 14 November 1302, her married name became de Bohun. Children of Lady Elizabeth Plantagenet and Humphrey de Bohun, 4th Earl of Hereford

  1. Edmund de Bohun1
  2. Margaret de Bohun+1 d. 16 Dec 1391
  3. Hugh de Bohun1 b. c 1303, d. 1305
  4. Eleanor de Bohun+1 b. 1304, d. 1363
  5. Mary de Bohun1 b. 1305, d. 1305
  6. John de Bohun, 5th Earl of Hereford1 b. 23 Nov 1306, d. 20 Jan 1336
  7. Humphrey de Bohun, 6th Earl of Hereford1 b. 1309, d. 1361
  8. William de Bohun, 1st Earl of Northampton+ b. c 1311, d. 16 Sep 1360
  9. Edward de Bohun1 b. c 1311, d. 1334
  10. Eneas de Bohun1 b. c 1314, d. b 1343 – Died without issue.
  11. Isabella de Bohun3 b. 1316, d. 1316

Citations

  1. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain’s Royal Families: The Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 84. Hereinafter cited as Britain’s Royal Families.
  2. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain’s Royal Families, page 83.

[S11] Alison Weir, Britain’s Royal Families, page 85. 1 John Carmi Parsons, “The Year of Eleanor of Castile’s Birth and Her Children by Edward I,” Mediaeval Studies, 46, 1984. 2 The Chronicle of Bury St Edmunds, 1212-1301, Antonia Gransden (ed.), Nelson Medieval Texts (London: 1964).

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The Search for Edward II’s Descendants 5) In which there are far too many Margarets…

For those of you eagerly awaiting further information about Craig L. Foster’s geneological research, here’s the next installment of the search!

In my last post, we looked at Elizabeth de Ros and her daughter Matilda. Now, we’re going to focus on Elizabeth’s sister Margaret, and her family. These were women connected to influential men and events, and it is a shame that there is so little documentation of their lives, both because this would be interesting in itself, and because the lack of it leaves this branch of our search in quite a muddled state.

Margaret de Ros was the first wife of Reynold Grey, 3rd Lord Grey (of Ruthin). He was a powerful Welsh marcher lord, whose dispute with Owain Glyndŵr over some common land sparked the Glyndŵr Rebellion. In 1415, he was a member of the council which governed England whilst Henry V was fighting in France, and he later served in France himself. Grey, via his second marriage, was the grandfather of John Grey of Groby, the first husband of English Queen Elizabeth Woodville. (For an outline of this interesting lady’s life, start with Jane Johnson Lewis’s summary here).

Margaret and her husband had two known children: one son, Sir John Grey (c.1387-1439), who was at Agincourt, and became a Knight of the Order of the Garter in 1436. and a daughter, also Margaret.

Our second Margaret, (Margaret Grey) was born in Ruthin Castle, Wales. She married Sir William Bonville, 1st Lord Bonville, in a contract dated 12th December 1414. Margaret and Bonville lived in the Manor of Chewton Mendip, in Somerset. This was a rural area involved with hunting, mining, and agriculture, which you can read more about on the Chewton Mendip History Website. Bonville was also the lord of the manors of Sponton and Hutton Bonville in Yorkshire. Margaret number two died around May 1426, and Bonville remarried in 1427. He went on to become Senechal of Aquitaine and Governor of Exeter Castle, but like so many of his contemporaries, (including his son and grandson) came to a sticky end during the Wars of the Roses, and was beheaded on 18th February 1461, by Queen Margaret of Anjou and the Lancastrians after the Second Battle of St. Albans.

Margaret Grey had at least two children. One was a son, also William Bonville – this was not a family known for innovation in naming! Through her son, Margaret is the great grandmother of the wealthy and influential heiress Cecily Bonville, and an ancestor of Lady Jane Grey. The second known child was a daughter, Elizabeth Bonville. Unfortunately for us, Elizabeth, who married Sir William Tailboys, seems to have only had one son. However, since after Margaret’s death her husband remarried and had more children, there is some uncertainty as to whether Margeret had other daughters. There is a Phillipa Bonville with ambiguous parentage, and yet another Margaret (Bonville), who married Sir William Courtenay of Powderham Castle. This third Margaret is sometimes listed as daughter of Sir William Bonville and a potential fourth Margaret (Merriet/Merriot), but elsewhere described as the daughter of Margaret Grey. Margaret Grey and Margaret Merriet may indeed be the same person, they have similar approximated death dates, and the sources I have access to are contradictory. More verifiable information about the identities of Phillipa Bonville, Margaret Bonville, and Margaret Merriet would mean a great deal to us, as it could help us continue the hunt for a living descendant. Genealogy fans out there, please lend us a hand!

Enrica Biasi

(The following information is courtesy of Craig L. Foster. Mr Foster is a research consultant at FamilySearch’s Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah (www.familysearch.org). FamilySearch collects digitized records and other information to assist people around the world searching after their ancestors. FamilySearch does not normally perform research on DNA and to search for living descendants.)

Generation 6

  1. Margaret de Ros

Margaret de Ros is the daughter of Thomas de Ros, 4th Lord de Ros of Helmsley and Beatrice de Stafford.2,3 She married Reynold Grey, 3rd Lord Grey (of Ruthin), son of Reynold de Grey, 2nd Lord Grey (of Ruthin) and Alianore Lestrange, after 25 November 1378.4  From after 25 November 1378, her married name became Grey.4

Children of Margaret de Ros and Reynold Grey, 3rd Lord Grey (of Ruthin)

  1. Margaret Grey+2 d. a May 1426
  2. Sir John Grey+5 b. c 1387, d. 27 Aug 1439

Citations

  1. [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 2, page 1817. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
  2. [S1545] Mitchell Adams, “re: West Ancestors,” e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 6 December 2005 – 19 June 2009. Hereinafter cited as “re: West Ancestors.”
  3. [S37] Charles Mosley, Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
  4. [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume VI, page 157. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.

[S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume VI, page 159.

Generation 7

  1. Margaret Grey

Margaret Grey was the daughter of Reynold Grey, 3rd Lord Grey (of Ruthin) and Margaret de Ros.1,2 She married Sir William Bonville, 1st Lord Bonville, son of John Bonville and Elizabeth FitzRoger, before June 1414.3,1 She died after May 1426.3  From before June 1414, her married name became Bonville.3

Children of Margaret Grey and Sir William Bonville, 1st Lord Bonville

  1. William Bonville+4 d. 31 Dec 1460
  2. Elizabeth Bonville+5 d. 14 Feb 1490/91 – Mar. Sir William Tailboys and had one son.

Citations

  1. [S2] Peter W. Hammond, editor, The Complete Peerage or a History of the House of Lords and All its Members From the Earliest Times, Volume XIV: Addenda & Corrigenda (Stroud, Gloucestershire, U.K.: Sutton Publishing, 1998), page 98. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage, Volume XIV.
  2. [S1545] Mitchell Adams, “re: West Ancestors,” e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 6 December 2005 – 19 June 2009. Hereinafter cited as “re: West Ancestors.”
  3. [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume II, page 218. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
  4. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume II, page 219.

[S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume VII, page 361.

The Search for Edward II’s Descendants 4) Joan of Acre’s lineage continues

Today, we’ll continue with Craig L. Foster’s geneological research. Craig, research consultant at the Family History Library, a division of FamilySearch, Salt Lake City, Utah, is tracing the direct female line of descent from Edward II’s mother, Eleanor of Castille, towards the present day, in the hopes of discovering a living carrier of Edward II’s mitochondrial DNA.

Last time, after our options following the de Clare lineage through generations 4 and 5 decreased, we were left with hopes that the de Ros daughters, (great-great granddaughters of Edward II’s sister Joan of Acre), had more daughters than sons. Remember, mitochondrial DNA is only transmitted by mothers to their children, so whilst both men and women bear it, we can only follow its passage through the female line.

The first daughter, Elizabeth, married Thomas de Clifford in 1373. Thomas was only aged around 10 at this time, and although we do not have a date of birth for Elizabeth, there cannot have been a notable age difference, given that she lived until 1424. Their marriage seems to have been a happy one; Elizabeth apparently referred to him after his death as “my most dear lord and husband”.1 Thomas was one of King Richard II’s chamber knights, attending court frequently, and succeeded to his father’s barony in 1390. He traveled far, present at jousting tournaments in Calais, according to Froissart2 and at a crusade in North Africa, according to another French chronicler.3 Nicolson and Burn claim that he died accompanying Thomas, duke of Gloucester, on his journey to “Spruce in Germany against the infidels, where he was slain 4 Oct. 1493”.4 Since the de Clifford’s owned extensive lands, Elizabeth, like the wives of many knights at the time, probably was responsible for overseeing them during her husband’s absence. In 1405, the famous French author Christine de Pizan wrote in A Medieval Woman’s Mirror of Honour: The Treasury of the City of Ladies: “these women spend most of their lives in households without husbands…so the ladies will have responsibilities for managing their property, their revenues, and their lands…she must manage it so well that by conferring with her husband, her gentle words and good counsel will lead to their agreement to follow a plan for the estate.”5 Women were seen as able to govern land on a practical basis, but only in their subservient role as wife.

Elizabeth and Thomas’s son John served Henry V at the Siege of Harfleur and the Battle of Agincourt, being made a Knight of the Order of the Garter in 1421. He was slain at the Siege of Meaux in 1422.6 John’s grandson Henry de Clifford inspired William Wordsworth’s poem, Song at the Feast of Brougham Castle upon the Restoration of Lord Clifford, the Shepherd, to the Estates and Honours of his Ancestors. Elizabeth, as a daughter, wife, and mother of two influential knights, would have been part of the small elite sector of fourteenth and fifteenth century society.

However, it is Elizabeth’s daughter Matilda, also known as Maud, who interests us most here. Sadly, she seems to have been unlucky in terms of husband choice. Her first marriage to John de Neville, 6th Baron Latimer, ended in divorce (or more properly, annulment), before 1414 due to “causa frigidatis ejusdem”, or impotence.7 Her second marriage, to Richard of Conisburgh, 3rd Earl of Cambridge, ended in 1415 when he was beheaded for his participation in the Southampton Plot. After that, Matilda apparently lived in “great state” at Conisburgh Castle and elsewhere until her death in 1446.8 Perhaps this was a relief for her: a life of luxury and independence without the men in her life causing trouble! Unfortunately for us, it means that we need to turn elsewhere if we are to find a living carrier of Edward II’s mitochondrial DNA. Matilda seems to have died without issue, although some genealogy sites suggest that she may have had a daughter by Richard called Alice Plantagenet, who married Thomas Musgrave. However we have not yet been able to find any verifiable source for this – please get in touch if you can help!

So now we’re left with only one more branch of this line, Elizabeth’s sister Margaret de Ros. Let’s hope we have more luck there!

(The following information is courtesy of Craig L. Foster. Mr Foster is a research consultant at FamilySearch’s Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah (www.familysearch.org). FamilySearch collects digitized records and other information to assist people around the world searching after their ancestors. FamilySearch does not normally perform research on DNA and to search for living descendants.)

Generation 6

80. Elizabeth de Ros

Elizabeth de Ros was the daughter of Thomas de Ros, 4th Lord de Ros of Helmsley and Beatrice de Stafford.1,2 She married Thomas de Clifford, 6th Lord Clifford, son of Roger de Clifford, 5th Lord Clifford and Maud de Beauchamp.2 She died in March 1424.2  Her married name became de Clifford.2

Children of Elizabeth de Ros and Thomas de Clifford, 6th Lord Clifford

  1. Matilda de Clifford1 d. 26 Aug 1446 – Died without issue.
  2. Sir John de Clifford, 7th Lord Clifford+3 b. c 1388, d. 13 Mar 1421/22

 

Enrica Biasi

Citations

  1. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain’s Royal Families: The Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 112. Hereinafter cited as Britain’s Royal Families.
  2. [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume III, page 292. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
  3. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume III, page 293.

1 Cumbria AS, WD/Hoth/Books of record, 2.329

2 J. Froissart, Chronicles of England, France, Spain, and the adjoining countries, trans. T. Johnes, 2 (1839), 436

3 H. Summerson, ‘Clifford, Thomas, sixth Baron Clifford (1362/3–1391)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004; online edn, Jan 2008 [http://www.oxforddnb.com/view/article/5662, accessed 17 Sept 2014]

4 Whitaker, History of Westmoreland, i. 281, 31

5 E. Amt, Women’s Lives in Medieval Europe, (1993) p. 164

6 G. Cokayne, (1913). The Complete Peerage, edited by H.A. Doubleday III. London: St. Catherine Press. p. 293.

7C. Mosley, editor. Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 106th edition, 2 volumes. Crans, Switzerland: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 1999. p. 14

8 G. Cokayne, (1932). The Complete Peerage, edited by H. A. Doubleday VIII. London: St. Catherine Press. p.495

Introducing a new member of the Auramala Project team!

I’m very proud to introduce to our followers a new member of the team. Enrica Biasi, who hails from Durham in the UK, has come to spend a year with us here in Pavia, and lend a hand with the hard work of the research project. She’s already proved a valuable asset to the Project, and we’re all sure she will contribute an enormous amount over the next year. Here is what she has to say about herself:

 

Hello, I’m Enrica, and I will be working with the Auramala Project for the next 10 months. After recently graduating from the University of Oxford with a BA in History, I’m incredibly excited to have the opportunity to work on the project, to find out whether there is any more compelling evidence to support the theory that Edward II did not die in Berkely Castle in 1327. As an avid fan of detective stories and mysteries, I hope to help chase down as many possible lines of enquiry and to get closer to some concrete certainties.

I’ll be starting by continuing to share the geneological research of Craig L. Foster, who is tracing Eleanor of Castille’s female descendants, adding as much detail as I can find to flesh out their personalities. Through this, I want to encourage interest in the history of these often obscure women, as well as gaining as much information as possible relevant to the Project, aiming for reliability, thoroughness, and verifiability. I’m looking forward to sharing my discoveries with you!

Enrica Biasi

 

Enrica’s first post will shortly be online!

The Search for Edward II’s Descendants 3) The de Clare lineage ends…

In today’s post we continue with the genealogical research of Craig L. Foster, research consultant at the Family History Library, a division of FamilySearch, Salt Lake City, Utah. Craig is following the direct female line of descendancy down from Edward II’s mother, Eleanor of Castille, toward the present, in the hopes of discovering a living carrier of Edward II’s mitochondrial DNA.

The last time we dipped into his research, we were following the de Clare lineage, descended from Edward II’s sister Joan of Acre, which produced many female descendants in Generation 3. Unfortunately, there’s bad news. Here we outline generations 4 and 5 following the same lineage, but you can see that with each generation the field narrows considerably, as female descendents most often did not have daughters. Fortunately, we see here in generation five a promising group of de Ros family daughters. Let’s keep our fingers crossed, and see how it turns out.

(The following information is courtesy of Craig L. Foster. Mr Foster is a research consultant at FamilySearch’s Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah (www.familysearch.org). FamilySearch collects digitized records and other information to assist people around the world searching after their ancestors. FamilySearch does not normally perform research on DNA and to search for living descendants.)

 

Generation 4

45. Eleanor le Despenser

Eleanor le Despenser, daughter of Lady Eleanor de Clare and Hugh le Despenser, 1st Lord le Despenser, married Sir Hugh de Courtenay.

Children of Eleanor le Despenser and Hugh de Courtenay

72. Margaret de Courtenay d. 18 Mar 1349 – Mar. Nicholas de Moels, 2nd Baron Moels and had one son.

48. Margaret Audley, Baroness Audley

MargaretAudley, Baroness Audley was the daughter of HughAudley, 1st and last Earl of Gloucester and MargaretdeClare.1 She married RalphdeStafford, 1st Earl of Stafford, son of EdmunddeStafford, 1st Lord Stafford and MargaretBasset, before 6 July 1336.1 She died between 1347 and 1351.1 She was buried at Tonbridge, Kent, England.2
She succeeded to the title of
2nd Baroness Audley [E., 1317] on 10 November 1347, suo jure.1

Children of Margaret Audley, Baroness Audley and RalphdeStafford, 1st Earl of Stafford

73. CatherinedeStafford+ d. a 6 Dec 1361 – Mar. Sir John de Sutton and had one son.

74. BeatricedeStafford+2 d. 14 Apr 1415

75. LadyElizabethdeStafford3 b. c 1334, d. 7 Aug 1376 – Died without issue.

76. JoandeStafford+4 b. 1336, d. b 1397 – Mar. John Cherleton, 3rd Lord Cherleton and had two sons.

77. SirRalphStafford b. b 1344, d. b 1347

78. HughdeStafford, 2nd Earl of Stafford+1 b. c 1344, d. 13 Oct 1386

Citations

  1. [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume I, page 346. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
  2. [S1545] Mitchell Adams, “re: West Ancestors,” e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 6 December 2005 – 19 June 2009. Hereinafter cited as “re: West Ancestors.”
  3. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume III, page 353.
  4. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume III, page 161.

Generation 5

74. BeatricedeStafford

BeatricedeStafford was the daughter of RalphdeStafford, 1st Earl of Stafford and MargaretAudley, Baroness Audley.2,1 She married, firstly, MauricefitzMaurice, 2nd Earl of Desmond, son of MauricefitzThomas, 1st Earl of Desmond.3 She married, secondly, ThomasdeRos, 4th Lord de Ros of Helmsley, son of WilliamdeRos, 2nd Lord de Ros of Helmsley and MargerydeBadlesmere, circa 1 January 1359.3 She married, thirdly, SirRichardBurley after 1384.3 She died on 14 April 1415.3
From after 1384, her married name became Burley.
3

Children of Beatrice de Stafford and ThomasdeRos, 4th Lord de Ros of Helmsley

  1. ElizabethdeRos+1 d. Mar 1424
  2. MargaretdeRos+2
  3. ThomasdeRos3
  4. RobertdeRos3
  5. JohndeRos, 5th Lord de Ros of Helmsley3 b. c 1368, d. 6 Aug 1393
  6. WilliamdeRos, 6th Lord de Ros of Helmsley+4 b. c 1369, d. 1 Sep 1414

Citations

  1. [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume III, page 292. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
  2. [S1545] Mitchell Adams, “re: West Ancestors,” e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 6 December 2005 – 19 June 2009. Hereinafter cited as “re: West Ancestors.”
  3. [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 1, page 1107. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
  4. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume XI, page 102.

 

 

The Search for Edward II’s Descendants 2) Joan of Acre’s descendants

Having published some significant progress in the historical and archival research, we decided it was time to continue with the genealogical research currently being carried out at the same time by Craig L. Foster, research consultant at the Family History Library, a division of FamilySearch, Salt Lake City, Utah. As mentioned in previous posts, Craig has been following the direct female line of descendants down from Edward II’s mother, Eleanor of Castille, toward the present, in the hopes of discovering a living carrier of Edward II’s mitochondrial DNA.

The Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah

The last time we took a look at his research, we had looked at the generation of Eleanor of Castille’s daughters1, and had singled out one possible fruitful line of research in the person of Joan of Acre. As Craig reports:

Joan of Acre was born circa April 1272 at Acre, Israel.2 She was the daughter of Edward I ‘Longshanks’, King of England and Eleanor de Castilla, Comtesse de Ponthieu. She married, firstly, Gilbert de Clare, 6th Earl of Gloucester, son of Richard de Clare, 5th Earl of Gloucester and Matilda de Lacy, on 30 April 1290 at Westminster Abbey, Westminster, London, England.2 She married, secondly, Ralph de Monthermer, Earl of Gloucester before 2 August 1297, without her father’s consent, although this was pardoned on 2 August 1297. She died on 23 April 1307 at Clare, Suffolk, England.3 She was buried at Priory Church of the Austin Friars, Clare, Suffolk, England.3
She was also known as Joan Plantagenet.4
From 30 April 1290, her married name became de Clare. From 1297, her married name became Monthermer.

So let’s continue down the line, where Joan of Acre’s children are a part of the vast de Clare lineage. Remember, the key aspect is that mitochondrial DNA follows the path from mothers to their children, but is NOT passed on to the next generation by men, only by women. So both men and women bear it, but only women transmit it.

(The following information is courtesy of Craig L. Foster. Mr Foster is a research consultant at FamilySearch’s Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah (www.familysearch.org). FamilySearch collects digitized records and other information to assist people around the world searching after their ancestors. FamilySearch does not normally perform research on DNA and to search for living descendants.)

Generation 3

25. Eleanor de Clare

Lady Eleanor de Clare was born in October 1292.2 She was the daughter of Gilbert de Clare, 6th Earl of Gloucester and Joan of Acre.1,2 She married, firstly, Hugh le Despenser, 1st Lord le Despenser, son of Hugh le Despenser, 1st and last Earl of Winchester and Isabella de Beauchamp, in 1306.3 She married, secondly, William la Zouche, 1st Lord Zouche of Mortimer, son of Robert de Mortimer and Joyce la Zouche, circa January 1328/29.4 She died on 30 June 1337 at age 44.5,3

Children of Lady Eleanor de Clare and Hugh le Despenser, 1st Lord le Despenser

  1. 43.   Elizabeth le Despencer+6 d. 13 Jul 1389 – Mar. Maurice de Berkeley, 4th Lord Berkeley and had only sons.
  2. 44.   Sir Edward le Despenser+3 d. 30 Sep 1342
  3. 45.   Eleanor le Despenser+
  4. 46.   Hugh le Despenser, 1st Lord le Despenser3 b. c 1308, d. 8 Feb 1348/49
  5. 47.   Isabel le Despenser+1 b. c 1313, d. 1375 – Mar. Richard FitzAlan, 10th Earl of Arundel and had one son.

Citations

  1. [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume I, page 243. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
  2. [S106] Royal Genealogies Website (ROYAL92.GED), online ftp://ftp.cac.psu.edu/genealogy/public_html/royal/index.html. Hereinafter cited as Royal Genealogies Website.
  3. [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 1, page 1385. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
  4. [S37] Charles Mosley, Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition, volume 3, page 4289.
  5. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain’s Royal Families: The Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 83. Hereinafter cited as Britain’s Royal Families.
  6. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume II, page 130.

26. Margaret de Clare

Margaret de Clare was born in 1293.2 She was the daughter of Gilbert de Clare, 6th Earl of Gloucester and Joan of Acre.1 She married, firstly, Piers Gaveston, 1st Earl of Cornwall circa 1307.3 She married, secondly, Hugh Audley, 1st and last Earl of Gloucester, son of Hugh Audley, 1st Lord Audley (of Stratton Audley) and Isolt de Mortimer, on 28 April 1317 at Windsor, Berkshire, England.3 She died in April 1342.2,3
From circa 1307, her married name became Gaveston. As a result of her marriage, Margaret de Clare was styled as Lady Audley on 28 April 1317. From 28 April 1317, her married name became Audley. As a result of her marriage, Margaret de Clare was styled as Countess of Gloucester on 16 March 1337.

Child of Margaret de Clare and Hugh Audley, 1st and last Earl of Gloucester

  1. 48.   Margaret Audley, Baroness Audley+3 d. bt 1347 – 1351

Citations

  1. [S106] Royal Genealogies Website (ROYAL92.GED), online ftp://ftp.cac.psu.edu/genealogy/public_html/royal/index.html. Hereinafter cited as Royal Genealogies Website.
  2. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain’s Royal Families: The Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 83. Hereinafter cited as Britain’s Royal Families.
  3. [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume I, page 346. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.

27. Elizabeth de Clare

Elizabeth de Clare was born on 16 September 1295.3 She was the daughter of Gilbert de Clare, 6th Earl of Gloucester and Joan of Acre.4,1 She married, firstly, John de Burgh, son of Richard de Burgh, 2nd Earl of Ulster and Margaret (?), on 30 September 1308 at Waltham Abbey, Essex, England.1 She married, secondly, Sir Theobald de Verdun, 2nd Lord Verdun, son of Theobald Verdun, 1st Lord Verdun and Margery de Bohun, on 4 February 1315/16.5 She married, thirdly, Roger d’Amorie, Lord d’Amorie in 1317. She died on 4 November 1360 at age 65.1 Her will was probated on 3 December 1360.4
She succeeded to the title of 11th Lady of Clare [feudal baron] on 24 June 1314.4 Her last will was dated 25 September 1355.

Child of Elizabeth de Clare and John de Burgh

  1. 49.   William de Burgh, 3rd Earl of Ulster+6 b. 17 Sep 1312, d. 6 Jun 1333

Child of Elizabeth de Clare and Roger d’Amorie, Lord d’Amorie

  1. 50.   Elizabeth d’Amorie+7 b. b 23 May 1318, d. 5 Feb 1360/61 – Mar. Sir John Bardolf, 3rd Lord Bardolf and had one son.

Citations

  1. [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume XII/2, page 177. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
  2. [S3409] Caroline Maubois, “re: Penancoet Family,” e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 2 December 2008. Hereinafter cited as “re: Penancoet Family.”
  3. [S106] Royal Genealogies Website (ROYAL92.GED), online ftp://ftp.cac.psu.edu/genealogy/public_html/royal/index.html. Hereinafter cited as Royal Genealogies Website.
  4. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume III, page 245.
  5. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume XII/2, page 251.
  6. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume XII/2, page 178.
  7. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume I, page 419.

28. Mary de Monthermer

Mary de Monthermer was born in 1298.2 She was the daughter of Ralph de Monthermer, Earl of Gloucester and Joan of Acre.3,1 She married Duncan MacDuff, 8th Earl of Fife, son of Duncan MacDuff, 7th Earl of Fife, after 1306.2 She died after 1371.2

Children of Mary de Monthermer and Duncan MacDuff, 8th Earl of Fife

  1. 51.Isabel MacDuff d. a 12 Aug 1389 – Died without issue.
  2. 52. Elizabeth MacDuff, Countess of Fife1 b. b 1332, d. a 12 Aug 1389 – Died without issue.

Citations

  1. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain’s Royal Families: The Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 215. Hereinafter cited as Britain’s Royal Families.
  2. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain’s Royal Families, page 83.
  3. [S106] Royal Genealogies Website (ROYAL92.GED), online ftp://ftp.cac.psu.edu/genealogy/public_html/royal/index.html. Hereinafter cited as Royal Genealogies Website.

We can see that Joan of Acre had four daughters, in the third generation counting from Eleanor of Castille. Let’s investigate what happened to them and their own daughters in the Joan of Acre/de Clare lineage in the fourth generation. As we progress, readers will notice that we don’t mention every single person mentioned as a child in the previous generation. This occurs where that individual female descendant had no daughters, bringing that particular line of research to a close. For example, No. 43, Elizabeth le Despencer, daughter of No. 25, Eleanor de Clare. She married, but had only sons, and as a consequence did not pass on the mitochondrial DNA molecule we are looking for, and so she takes her bow with this generation. In the next blog post she, and others like her in this respect, will not appear. In the next post we’ll go into the fourth generation with results concerning her sisters and first cousins.

To summarise the work so far, we’ve followed the Joan of Acre/de Clare line down a couple of generations, and we can see that Eleanor of Castille’s female line is still looking healthy here. The family-tree mapping is an ongoing process, and we still have not found our living descendant(s), so please, genealogy enthusiasts, do keep checking on this blog and write to us as soon as you see a name appear in these genealogy blog posts that you know for certain appears in your own family tree. We really need people around the world to get involved and help us track descendants. A big thank you in advance to anybody who can help with this.

Note: Craig L. Foster has made extensive use of the resources of the Family History Library, and thepeerage.com

The Search for Edward II’s Descendants 1) Craig L. Foster of the Family History Library enters the team

After a several-month hiatus, the genealogy side of our blog is coming back to life, keeping a pace with the progress in the archival research.

Since May 2013, we have enjoyed the collaboration of Craig L. Foster, a research consultant at the Family History Library, a division of FamilySearch, based in Salt Lake City, Utah. This is a privilege for the Auramala Project, as Craig is well respected professional in a highly specialised field, and is working with the largest and most detailed genealogical databases in the world. Craig has been following the direct female line of descendancy down from Edward II’s mother, Eleanor of Castille, toward the present, in the hopes of discovering a living carrier of Edward II’s mitochondrial DNA. It is painstaking and at times frustrating research, and it is not the regular work of the Family History Library, since their emphasis is on assisting people to find their ancestors. We are very grateful both to Craig and the Family History Library for the time and effort dedicated to the Auramala Project.

Family History Libary
The Family History Library, Utah

The family-tree mapping is an ongoing process, and we still have not found our living descendant(s), so please, genealogy enthusiasts, do keep checking on this blog and write to us as soon as you see a name appear in these genealogy blog posts that you know for certain appears in your own family tree. We really need people around the world to get involved and help us track descendants. A big thank you in advance to anybody who can help with this.

So let’s get into the nitty gritty of things, by following one of the lines that Craig has mapped out. Remember, the key aspect is that mitochondrial DNA follows the path from mothers to their children, but is NOT passed on to the next generation by men, only by women. So both men and women bear it, but only women transmit it.

(The following information is courtesy of Craig L. Foster. Mr Foster is a research consultant at FamilySearch’s Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah (www.familysearch.org). FamilySearch collects digitized records and other information to assist people around the world searching after their ancestors. FamilySearch does not normally perform research on DNA and to search for living descendants.)

The effigy of Eleanor of Castile in Westminster Abbey
The effigy of Eleanor of Castile in Westminster Abbey

FEMALE DESCENDANTS OF EDWARD I AND ELEANOR DE CASTILLA

The first generation is made up of the 17 (!) children of Eleanor herself, including Edward II. Of these, only female children who had female children of their own interest the research, as they are the only ones to pass on Eleanor’s mitochondrial DNA. These daughters are in red.

Generation 1

Children of Edward I ‘Longshanks’, King of England and Eleanor de Castilla, Comtesse de Ponthieu

  1. 1.      Eleanor of England+ b. 17 Jun 1264, d. 12 Oct 1298
  2. 2.      Joan of England b. c Jun 1265, d. b 7 Sep 1265
  3. 3.      John of England b. 10 Jul 1266, d. 3 Aug 1271
  4. 4.      Alice of England b. c 1267, d. 1279
  5. 5.      Henry of England b. 13 Jul 1267, d. 14 Oct 1274
  6. 6.      Juliana of England b. 1271, d. 28 May 1271 (Known as Katherine of England)
  7. 7.      Joan of Acre+ b. c Apr 1272, d. 23 Apr 1307
  8. 8.      Alfonso of England, 1st Earl of Chester b. 24 Nov 1273, d. 19 Aug 1284
  9. 9.      Margaret of England+ b. 11 Sep 1275, d. 1318
  10. 10.  Berengaria of England b. 1276, d. bt 1276 – 1279
  11. 11.  Mary of England b. 11 Mar 1278, d. b 8 Jul 1332
  12. 12.  Alice of England b. 12 Mar 1279, d. c 1291
  13. 13.  Isabella of England1 b. 12 Mar 1279, d. 1279
  14. 14.  Elizabeth Plantagenet+ b. Aug 1282, d. 5 May 1316
  15. 15.  Edward II, King of England+ b. 25 Apr 1284, d. 21 Sep 1327
  16. 16.  Beatrice of England b. c 1286
  17. 17.  Blanche of England b. c 1290, d. 1290

Unfortunately, the line of Eleanor of England dies out very quickly, due to the extremely unhappy love-life of her daughter Joan de Bar (see Kathryn Warner’s blog on Edward II for all the details). For the moment, we will follow the line represented by Joan of Acre, the seventh child of Edward I ‘Longhsanks’ and Eleanor of Castille.

7. Joan of Acre Plantagenet

Joan of Acre was born circa April 1272 at Acre, Israel.2 She married, firstly, Gilbert de Clare, 6th Earl of Gloucester, son of Richard de Clare, 5th Earl of Gloucester and Matilda de Lacy, on 30 April 1290 at Westminster Abbey, Westminster, London, England.2 She married, secondly, Ralph de Monthermer, Earl of Gloucester before 2 August 1297, without her father’s consent, although this was pardoned on 2 August 1297. She died on 23 April 1307 at Clare, Suffolk, England.3 She was buried at Priory Church of the Austin Friars, Clare, Suffolk, England.3
She was also known as Joan Plantagenet.4 From 30 April 1290, her married name became de Clare. From 1297, her married name became Monthermer.

Children of Joan of Acre and Gilbert de Clare, 6th Earl of Gloucester

  1. 1.      Gilbert de Clare, 7th Earl of Gloucester5 b. 10 May 1291, d. 24 Jun 1314
  2. 2.      Eleanor de Clare+1 b. Oct 1292, d. 30 Jun 1337
  3. 3.      Margaret de Clare+1 b. 1293, d. Apr 1342
  4. 4.      Elizabeth de Clare+6 b. 16 Sep 1295, d. 4 Nov 1360

Children of Joan of Acre and Ralph de Monthermer, Earl of Gloucester

  1. 1.      Mary de Monthermer+1 b. 1298, d. a 1371
  2. 2.      Joan de Monthermer1 b. 1299 – Became a nun
  3. 3.      Thomas de Monthermer, 2nd Baron Monthermer+1 b. 1301, d. 1340
  4. 4.      Edward de Monthermer, 3rd Baron Monthermer1 b. 1304, d. b 3 Feb 1340

Citations

  1. [S106] Royal Genealogies Website (ROYAL92.GED), online ftp://ftp.cac.psu.edu/genealogy/public_html/royal/index.html. Hereinafter cited as Royal Genealogies Website.
  2. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain’s Royal Families: The Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 82. Hereinafter cited as Britain’s Royal Families.
  3. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain’s Royal Families, page 83.
  4. [S125] Richard Glanville-Brown, online , Richard Glanville-Brown (RR 2, Milton, Ontario, Canada), downloaded 17 August 2005.
  1. [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume III, page 244. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
  2. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume III, page 245.

Naturally, this line continues with the children of Joan of Acre’s daughters, in this case Eleanor de Clare, Margaret de Clare, Elizabeth de Clare and Mary de Monthermer. This is a very fruitful line. As Craig Foster wrote to me in a recent email “there are thousands upon thousands of descendants. I’m a descendant in this line, but not along the direct female line, so I don’t have the mitochondrial DNA we’re looking for.”

We’ll see how this, and other lines work out in following blog posts.

Note: Craig L. Foster has made extensive use of the resources of the Family History Library, and thepeerage.com