Progress in the archival research

After three months of silence, the Auramala Project blog is finally back in action with updates on Phase 2 of the project – the historical research in the archives. We have not been on holiday since our last post in May – far from it! In that time we have:

-visited the archives of sixteen different cities in Italy, England and France;

-viewed more than ten thousand pages of archival documents;

-read through, in detail, nearly four thousand pages of archival documents;

-transcribed and translated eighteen historical documents which were previously unknown, unpublished or both, but which relate to the Fieschi Letter and the ‘afterlife’ of Edward II;

-conducted extensive research into published historical texts dating back to the 19th, 18th and 17th centuries.

A symbolic image of archival research: a fragment of 14th century parchment re-used as binding of a 16th century parish register.
A symbolic image of archival research: a fragment of 14th century parchment re-used as binding of a 16th century parish register.

Obviously, this has been the work of a dedicated team of volunteers, and over the next few blogposts we’ll be introducing these heroes of the Auramala Project to you, and detailing exactly what each person has contributed to Phase 2 of the Project. It’s been an exciting, and exhausting, journey, and it’s not over yet. We’re still hard at work trying to tie up loose ends and make sure we have left no stone unturned, but the actual results of the research will be forthcoming in time, don’t worry.

The next post will be about Elena Corbellini, retired latin teacher, writer, journalist and philologist who has trawled through literally thousands of pages of handwritten archival material with endless energy and enthusiasm, and whose connection with the story of Edward II in the Staffora Valley dates back to the early 1990s.

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